The price you pay for electricity in February of 2024 — your electric rate per kWh — depends on numerous factors including (but not limited to) your location, type of building (residential/commercial), usage, general market conditions, market disruptions, etc.  Whether you’re in a regulated or deregulated market, the bill you receive from your utility/provider should clearly state the rate you’re paying for electricity.

Average Electricity Rates by State

Below is the average kWh rate for each state.  This is a snapshot of average kWh rates in regulated and deregulated states using data from November 2022 and November 2023 (showing YOY change).

For current (January 2024) electric rates in deregulated markets, enter in your zip code above to see current rates from retail energy providers in your area.  

Electricity (kWh) Prices by State

STATE Jan 2024 Dec 2023 MOVEMENT CHANGE (%)
Alabama 12.41¢ / kWh 12.79¢ / kWh DOWN -2.971 %
Alaska 22.54¢ / kWh 22.14¢ / kWh UP 1.806 %
Arizona 13.16¢ / kWh 12.65¢ / kWh UP 4.031 %
Arkansas 9.99¢ / kWh 10.73¢ / kWh DOWN -6.896 %
California 19.90¢ / kWh 19.39¢ / kWh UP 2.630 %
Colorado 12.28¢ / kWh 12.75¢ / kWh DOWN -3.686 %
Connecticut 21.62¢ / kWh 20.47¢ / kWh UP 5.617 %
DC 13.21¢ / kWh 13.40¢ / kWh DOWN -1.417 %
Delaware 12.05¢ / kWh 12.59¢ / kWh DOWN -4.289 %
Florida 11.37¢ / kWh 12.02¢ / kWh DOWN -5.407 %
Georgia 12.26¢ / kWh 12.53¢ / kWh DOWN -2.154 %
Hawaii 32.76¢ / kWh 30.45¢ / kWh UP 7.586 %
Idaho 10.58¢ / kWh 11.42¢ / kWh DOWN -7.355 %
Illinois 12.56¢ / kWh 12.95¢ / kWh DOWN -3.011 %
Indiana 12.02¢ / kWh 12.05¢ / kWh DOWN -0.248 %
Iowa 13.81¢ / kWh 13.92¢ / kWh DOWN -0.790 %
Kansas 11.56¢ / kWh 13.56¢ / kWh DOWN -14.74 %
Kentucky 10.56¢ / kWh 10.68¢ / kWh DOWN -1.123 %
Louisiana 9.37¢ / kWh 10.19¢ / kWh DOWN -8.047 %
Maine 16.16¢ / kWh 16.17¢ / kWh DOWN -0.061 %
Maryland 13.92¢ / kWh 14.22¢ / kWh DOWN -2.109 %
Massachusetts 21.11¢ / kWh 18.56¢ / kWh UP 13.73 %
Michigan 16.07¢ / kWh 15.86¢ / kWh UP 1.324 %
Minnesota 14.09¢ / kWh 13.96¢ / kWh UP 0.931 %
Mississippi 11.55¢ / kWh 11.40¢ / kWh UP 1.315 %
Missouri 13.23¢ / kWh 13.25¢ / kWh DOWN -0.150 %
Montana 11.85¢ / kWh 11.73¢ / kWh UP 1.023 %
Nebraska 11.31¢ / kWh 12.06¢ / kWh DOWN -6.218 %
Nevada 11.67¢ / kWh 11.64¢ / kWh UP 0.257 %
New Hampshire 19.63¢ / kWh 19.30¢ / kWh UP 1.709 %
New Jersey 15.64¢ / kWh 15.96¢ / kWh DOWN -2.005 %
New Mexico 13.37¢ / kWh 13.41¢ / kWh DOWN -0.298 %
New York 19.30¢ / kWh 18.76¢ / kWh UP 2.878 %
North Carolina 11.24¢ / kWh 11.07¢ / kWh UP 1.535 %
North Dakota 12.07¢ / kWh 12.34¢ / kWh DOWN -2.188 %
Ohio 12.64¢ / kWh 12.67¢ / kWh DOWN -0.236 %
Oklahoma 10.72¢ / kWh 10.53¢ / kWh UP 1.804 %
Oregon 11.02¢ / kWh 10.97¢ / kWh UP 0.455 %
Pennsylvania 14.38¢ / kWh 14.52¢ / kWh DOWN -0.964 %
Rhode Island 18.64¢ / kWh 16.65¢ / kWh UP 11.95 %
South Carolina 12.91¢ / kWh 13.07¢ / kWh DOWN -1.224 %
South Dakota 12.39¢ / kWh 12.57¢ / kWh DOWN -1.431 %
Tennessee 10.79¢ / kWh 10.93¢ / kWh DOWN -1.280 %
Texas 11.36¢ / kWh 11.15¢ / kWh UP 1.883 %
Utah 10.63¢ / kWh 11.48¢ / kWh DOWN -7.404 %
Vermont 18.50¢ / kWh 18.02¢ / kWh UP 2.663 %
Virginia 12.40¢ / kWh 11.91¢ / kWh UP 4.114 %
Washington 9.79¢ / kWh 9.95¢ / kWh DOWN -1.608 %
West Virginia 11.57¢ / kWh 11.69¢ / kWh DOWN -1.026 %
Wisconsin 14.28¢ / kWh 15.05¢ / kWh DOWN -5.116 %
Wyoming 12.30¢ / kWh 12.21¢ / kWh UP 0.737 %

What determines your electric rate?

There are numerous factors that determine the price you pay (kWh) for electricity.

  • Residential or Commercial:  Providers typically have a different set of rates for different “customer classes” — residential, commercial, and industrial customers.
  • Usage: The amount of electricity you use each month (called kilowatt-hours or kWh) is a major factor in determining your electric bill.  The more energy you use, the more you’ll pay
  • “Time of use” rates — not as well known, the price you pay can sometimes vary depending on the time of day.  “Peak rates” are typically charged during the hours when demand is highest (like a blizzard, or heat wave).  Off-peak rates are typically charged during the hours when demand is lower, such as at night or during milder temperatures

In regulated markets, you’re stuck with the rate provided to you by your local utility.  In deregulated energy markets, you can shop around and attempt to find a better electric rate at another provider in your area.